PUMPKIN MADNESS AT HATTON ADVENTURE FARM

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Visitors at Hatton Adventure Farm will have the pick of the crop this season, thanks to staff who planted more than 40,000 pumpkin seeds back in spring.

Pumkin Event gallery

Fields at the popular tourist attraction are bountiful with large golden pumpkins, ahead of the big pick at Hatton’s popular Pumpkin Festival, which runs from October 26 until November 3.

Each year, hundreds of children eagerly pick the gourds from the pumpkin patch, while events in the marquee take on a spooky turn, with creepy crawlies (including real snakes and spiders), spine-chilling music and an array of ghostly ghouls and witches greet those brave enough to enter the horror-themed pumpkin house in the run up to Halloween.

Farm Manager Richard Craddock, who also oversees the running of the event which is now in its tenth year, said: “Children love to be spooked so we have given over part of the events marquee to a Halloween theme with a pumpkin house complete with a haunted forest, Dracula’s Castle, Witch’s Kitchen and an ultraviolet room. It’s pretty scary!”

This year, the farm’s onsite restaurant will serve delicious horror-themed dishes and staff will be dressed for the occasion, Richard said: “In order to fully relish in the festivities, we are encouraging all visitors to join staff by coming along in fancy dress costumes.”

Visitors will experience the thrills and chills of the season outdoors, as the adventure farm has also planted thousands of ‘ghost rider’ pumpkins that produce dark orange fruits, which have a rare, dark green handle and its sweet and stringless interior flesh, makes them perfect for carving and making jack o’lanterns.

“Pumpkin picking continues to be incredibly popular,” informs Mr Craddock, “The children get to choose their own fruit from the patch, which they can take home or be helped to carve on site for entry into a competition. We’ve also got a pumpkin hunt around the adventure farm and fun games for all the family.”